Kelsall DNA Project

For those participating in the DNA project

Kelsall DNA Project

Postby Peter Kelsall » Fri Feb 11, 2011 1:41 am

have established a DNA project for the surname Kelsall (and some variants) and I am hoping some of you will be persuaded to join and be tested.

The Kelsall DNA Project has been established at Family Tree DNA, and it is ready for participants to join and order a test kit. Full details about testing methods and the scientific basis are at the Family Tree DNA web site.

http://www.familytreedna.com/Default.aspx

The Kelsall group project is at the following link.

http://www.familytreedna.com/group-join ... up=Kelsall

The test we are using is the Y DNA which tells you about your direct male line, which would be your father, his father, and back in time. You must be male to take this test, and you should have the Kelsall surname or one of the variants such as Kelsell. If you believe there is another Kelsall variant in your direct male line, although you have a different surname, you are also welcome to participate. If you are female, you can perhaps find a direct line male to participate, to represent your tree.

We encourage males to order a Y DNA test for 37 markers. The current price for the Y-DNA 37 is $149 plus postage (149 US dollars). This is discounted price for someone who joins a surname group. A test kit can be ordered from anywhere in the world. The test is a harmless genealogy test of locations on the Y chromosome, called markers, which are passed from father to son, typically unchanged. The test result is a string of numbers, and contains no personal information. You will be an exact or close match to those men to whom you are related. By also testing a distant direct line male in your family tree, if possible, you will validate the family tree research to the common ancestor shared by both men who test. In addition, the test result will tell you about your distant origins. You can read more at Family Tree DNA.
Peter Kelsall
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Re: Kelsall DNA Project

Postby Peter Kelsall » Sat Nov 03, 2012 9:27 pm

I am writing again about the Kelsall DNA project. I will show some results which I hope will encourage you or a relative to join and be tested

The Kelsall DNA Project has been established at Family Tree DNA. Full details about testing methods and the scientific basis are at the Family Tree DNA web site.

http://www.familytreedna.com/Default.aspx


The Kelsall group project is at the following.

http://www.familytreedna.com/group-join ... up=Kelsall

So far we have two people tested, let’s call them A (who happens to be me) and B. The table below shows the results compared for 12 of the 37 DNA markers that are usually tested.


A 13 24 14 11 12 15 12 12 13 13 13 29
B 13 24 14 11 11 15 12 12 13 13 13 29

Each of these numbers represents the number of times that a sequence of DNA is repeated at a particular marker on the Y chromosome. You will see that all the results are the same except one. When we compare A and B for all 37 markers there are five numbers that are different and this is called a genetic distance of 5. Each different number is a mutation on a piece of what has been called “junk DNA” that has nothing to do with the size of your ears or genetic disorders.

Now we know from genealogy that A and B are very likely related. From our research B is approximately my 6th cousin possibly one or two times removed, and our common ancestor is Richard Kelsall born 1713, 7 generations from me. Interestingly, based only on average mutation rates, FamilyTreeDNA reports that a genetic distance of 5 in 37 markers corresponds to a probability of only 10% that we are related in 8 generations. So what does that mean, that we are not related as believed? Not necessarily, since the genealogical evidence is strong. FamilyTreeDNA is reporting only probability for a large population and we may be just part of the 10% that for whatever reason has had one or two more mutations than average.

What happens if you get tested? FamilyTreeDNA will add your numbers to the table above (actually all 37 markers). What might we see? You could match to either A or B, or be close to both, or you could be quite distinct from both. As more people get tested we will see groupings of similar results that will confirm known relationships or perhaps point to unknown relationships. Ultimately we might determine if all Kelsall lines have a common ancestor in Cheshire in the 15th century or so, or if there are separate lines.

The test we are using is the Y DNA which tells you about your direct male line, which would be your father, his father, and back in time. You must be male to take this test, and you should have the Kelsall surname or one of the variants such as Kelsell. If you believe there is another Kelsall variant in your direct male line, although you have a different surname, you are also welcome to participate. If you are female, you can perhaps find a direct line male to participate, to represent your tree.

We encourage males to order a Y DNA test for 37 markers. The current price for the Y-DNA 37 is $149 plus postage (149 US dollars). This is discounted price for someone who joins a surname group. A test kit can be ordered from anywhere in the world. The test is a harmless genealogy test of locations on the Y chromosome, called markers, which are passed from father to son, typically unchanged. The test result is a string of numbers, and contains no personal information. You will be an exact or close match to those men to whom you are related. By also testing a distant direct line male in your family tree, if possible, you will validate the family tree research to the common ancestor shared by both men who test. In addition, the test result will tell you about your distant origins. You can read more at Family Tree DNA.

I realize this is a lot of money to join but it does not compare too badly to say a subscription to Ancestry or a trip to distant record offices. The results will be fascinating if we can get enough people from different lines to join.

Please let me know if you are interested or not, or if you have questions.

Peter Kelsall
Peter Kelsall
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